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The Quintessential Village

The beautiful village of Welford-on-Avon sits within a bend of the River Avon and is mentioned in the Domesday book, but with origins dating back much further.

The quintessential village of Welford-on-Avon lies about 4 miles from the historic town of Stratford-upon-Avon. The village sits within a bend of the River Avon. It was formerly a part of Gloucestershire but since 1931 it has been classed as a Warwickshire village.

Mentioned in the Domesday Book, but with origins dating back much further, the development of Welford has taken place over many centuries. The oldest listings of well-known landmarks include the first Church built on the site of St Peter’s during the 12th century. The church stands a short distance from the river, and the site of a ford which gave the village its name. The church tower was said to have been used as a landmark by travellers using the ford. 

The 17th century saw the introduction of the many timber-framed cottages and the Wesleyan Chapel was constructed late in the 18th century.

Welford’s historical roots are firmly based in agriculture and is still bordered by predominantly arable farmland.

The village has many excellent facilities including pubs, clubs and societies.

It has a traditional maypole, one of the tallest in England at 65 feet high!  Once wooden, but after a lightning strike, it was replaced with an aluminium pole.

It is no surprise that Welford was named the winner or runner-up in the Warwickshire "Best Kept Village Competition" 12 times between 1991 and 2007.       

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